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Success Stories

Photo by Ashley Kinney

Mother of Seven Survives Attack, Fights Infection and Cares for Young

On July 13, 2012 the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley admitted an adult female opossum. She’d been found wedged between two tree stumps after being attacked by a dog. As it turned out, she was not only suffering from bite wounds, dehydration and malnutrition – she was also a mom, carrying seven young opossums in her pouch.
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Photo by Ruth McDunn

Six Coyotes Released after Six Months

The Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley released six coyotes at Los Vaqueros Watershed on October 8, 2012. The animals were ready to rejoin their remote habitat in the hills, adjacent to the water with plenty of natural food sources. The first two coyotes shot out of their transport kennels leaving four behind to pop their heads up and cautiously explore their new space. Soon, all were out of sight and covered by dusk.
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Photo by CJ Baldwin

Hawk Shot with Nail Gun Flies Free

On October 22, 2011, after a long week of attempts, WildRescue successfully and safely captured a Red-tailed Hawk at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco that had been shot with a nail gun.
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Photo by CJ Baldwin

Wildlife Center Works with Adobe to Successfully Rehabilitate Hawk

On January 21, 2011, the Wildlife Center received an injured Red-Shouldered Hawk when a volunteer found her in the road favoring her left wing.
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Photo by CJ Baldwin

Coyote Released on March 15

In September of 2010 the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley received a coyote from San Jose. When he arrived, he was severely dehydrated, malnourished, and riddled with mange. On Tuesday, March 15, 2011 the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley released the coyote in Santa Theresa Park in San Jose after successful treatment and rehabilitation.
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Photo by Ashley Kinney

Peregrine Falcon Defies Odds & Takes Flight

On February 15th, 2010, the Wildlife Center received a Peregrine falcon with severe tissue damage from her left talon up to the tip of her left wing after flying into a PG&E Electrical tower. Now we are very happy to announce that she is healthy enough to fly, and will begin strength-building creance training with a group of animal care volunteers trained in falconry.
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Photo by Stephen Rosenthal

Bufflehead Released After Successful Rehabilitation

On December 23rd, 2010, the Wildlife Center received an adult male Bufflehead that had been found injured on the road in San Jose. After over a month of care, on February 5th, 2011, one of our caring volunteers released this Bufflehead back into the wild at Lake Cunningham.
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Photo by Ashley Kinney

Barn Owl Babies Reunited with Parents

During the first week of April 2010, the WCSV received two nestling Barn Owls that had been found at the side of the road after the palm tree they were nesting in had been cut down. In addition to feeding and caring for the owlets, the Center staff and volunteers worked quickly to build a new nest box that could be used to help return the babies to their parents. On April 9th, the nest box was erected in the same spot the birds were found and the owlets were placed inside.
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Photo by Ashley Kinney

Injured Bobcat Back on the Prowl

In early December 2009, a female yearling bobcat was brought to the Center with a broken leg after a Santa Clara County Park (SCCP) volunteer spotted her limping along a road near Uvas Reservoir. In addition to the fracture, she was anemic, emaciated and covered in fleas and ticks. She was so weak that Open Space Authority (OSA) rangers were able to quickly capture and transport her to the Center. “The most likely scenario is that she snagged her leg on something,” said Ashley Kinney, WCSV’s animal care assistant. “If she hadn’t been rescued and brought to the Center, she certainly would have perished within a few days.”
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Photo by Stephanie Ellis

Cormorant Gets Best Valentine’s Day Gift Possible

On February 5, 2010, we received an immature Double-crested Cormorant that had swallowed a fishing hook. The monofilament was hanging from his mouth. His wing was also constricted by monofilament and fishing hardware. The bird was transferred to Adobe Veterinary Hospital the next day for a radiograph. The fishing hook was lodged in his proventriculus (upper portion of GI) and the hospital conducted surgery that evening to remove it. After spending some time recuperating at the Center, the cormorant was released at Almaden Lake in South San Jose on Valentine’s Day.
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Photo by Ashley Kinney

Disabled Barn Owl Defies Odds and Learns to Fly

When a wild bird is born with a wing deformity, the chance of it achieving strong enough flight skills for a successful life in the wild is only about 15%. Apparently no one told that to a special barn owl who arrived at the Center as a downy nestling in June 2009. After months of rehabilitation and careful training, the owl gained full flight and hunting capabilities and was released at Alum Rock Park on December 17.
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Photo by Mike Mammoser

Western Grebe Caught in Fishing Line Now Gone Fishin’ Herself

On June 6th, WCSV Director of Animal Care, Stephanie Ellis, released a Western Grebe, one of the less common birds we treat at the Center. Here is her account of the grebe’s rehabilitation. “The grebe came in thin and weak with fishing line constricting movement of the right wing. I removed the line and she had some minor soft-tissue swelling and abrasions where the line had been.
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Canada Geese: From Eggs to Release

Over the Easter 2009 weekend, the Center gained some new patients when seven orphaned Canada Geese eggs hatched in our incubators. When they were ready to go outside, they were placed with an adult who didn’t seem too interested in them. Our concern was that the young’uns wouldn’t learn what it meant to be a goose. Fortunately, on May 5th, the seven hatched goslings—along with four others that had come in to the Center—were successfully released into an existing wild population at Shoreline Park in Mountain View.
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Photo by Connie Devine

In Nature, Mother Knows Best

When five baby Fox squirrels were taken from their nest in March 2009 by trimmers working on a large eucalyptus tree, they couldn’t have known how lucky they were that the tree belonged to Grady Jackson. The Morgan Hill resident, who raises Chesapeake Bay retrievers, didn’t know much about squirrels, but he knew he needed professional advice to help these young and vulnerable animals. Grady contacted WCSV and was put in touch with June Ferrero, our squirrel team coordinator.
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Photo by Carmel de Bertaut

Good Samaritan Heeds Coyote Cries for Help

On a Sunday evening in late April 2008, Monique Lee received a phone call from a UCSC student (who prefers to remain anonymous). The student and his girlfriend had heard cries coming from outside his off-campus dorm room and they had discovered two young coyote pups at the entrance to a den eight feet up a cliff face.
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